Looking in on Music: Challenges and Opportunities for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Susan Wharton Conkling

Abstract


Whereas most articles in this special issue demonstrate careful and close-up views of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) in a performing arts or humanities discipline, my approach is opposite; I look in on music teaching and learning to interrogate current conceptions of SoTL. I begin with Sloboda’s cognitive explanation of music expertise and consider how music expertise is established relatively early in life. I then proceed to develop two case studies of music in higher education showing how each case illustrates expertise, and highlighting experts’ desires for progressively greater challenges. I argue that collaboration with other expert performers is one sort of challenge that meets such desires. By drawing attention to collaboration, I then reframe music as social practice, and I highlight the qualities of participatory performance. In the latter part of the article, I turn my attention toward explaining what it means to think about learning as participation in a community of practice, and I draw on the case studies to demonstrate that such a view presents both challenges and opportunities for SoTL.


Keywords


Learning As Acquisition; Learning As Participation; Liberal Education; Musical Expertise; Music Industry; Presentational Performance; Participatory Performance

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.4.1.11

PID: http://hdl.handle.net/10515/sy5t727z7

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